Survey Shows Majority of Australians Prefer Renewable Energy to Become Main Energy Source

A new survey shows that majority of Australians want to utilise renewable energy even though the federal government identifies renewables as upscale and unreliable.

The survey had 2,660 respondents, and 71% of them were convinced climate change was happening. The result backs up the previous related surveys conducted in 2014 and 2015. Fifty-seven percent of the respondents acknowledged that human activity was the main reason and two-thirds of them were concerned by its overall effect.

One of the major factors of the survey results shows that a huge percentage of the respondents wanted Australia’s main energy source to be renewable, supported by either technologies (58%) or fossil fuels (38%). A large number of respondents also agree with the phaseout of coal and substituting it with clean energy. Seventy-two percent also want the government to advance and boost the transition.

“It is really striking that people have come out the other side of that discussion with really strong support for renewable energy and a strong sense that we need to go towards a cleaner energy system,” said Olivia Kember, the Acting Chief Executive of the Climate Institute.

The survey results also echoed the insights of the people who think that high electricity prices were due to the privatisation of electricity generation and supply (55%) and inadequate policy-making (44%). Kember added, “What they see are higher prices, worse service, and companies that seem to be profiteering.”

There was also an indication that majority of the respondents were inclined to favor the Paris agreement in order to control global warming. Moreover, most of them could not comprehend the reason behind the Australian government’s slow action to implement firmer and more substantial efforts to deliver on it. Sixty-one percent of people who responded to the survey said Australia should “work harder” to achieve the long-term goal of the Paris deal.

To read the full report, click here.