USA, Washington, Hawaii, and Iowa Report

Washington, Hawaii and Iowa are three states that have very different landscapes, natural resources and economies. As a consequence, they all have very different energy and climate change policies and electricity generation portfolios.

 

The unique combination of resources and economic priorities in each state has led to varying outcomes in the renewable energy sector and it will be interesting to observe how the industry changes and grows in these states. For further detail about the renewable energy targets and policies in these three states please download the full report.

 

To read the full Washington, Hawaii, and Iowa report as part of our Research Series, please download the PDF below.

Phillip Riley Research Series: USA, Washington, Hawaii, and Iowa

Phillip riley research series: USA, washington, hawaii, and iowa report

Washington, Hawaii and Iowa are three states that have very different landscapes, natural resources and economies. As a consequence, they all have very different energy and climate change policies and electricity generation portfolios.

Washington state already has an relatively clean generation portfolio compared to other states, thanks mostly to its enormous hydroelectric generation capacity. Washington’s energy policy is generally supporting of renewables and it is considered one of the nation’s “greenest” states, with a renewable energy target, caps on emissions from polluters and the possibility of the nation’s first carbon tax, which will lead to further growth in the wind and biomass fields especially.

Hawaii’s energy use has long been centred on costly imported fossil fuels but the state has made outstanding commitments to switch to a cleaner energy supply. Hawaii is working towards reducing the state’s reliance on energy imports and increasing the utilisation of their abundant renewable resources and it is the first state to set a legal deadline for becoming 100% renewable.

Iowa again differs to the other states studied. It has an impressive wind power industry and in 2015 over 30% of the state’s electricity generation came from wind – the highest percentage of any state. Iowa’s renewable energy targets were exceeded many years ago and have not been updated however the renewables sector continues to grow.

Renewable energy sources for electricity generation 2016

The unique combination of resources and economic priorities in each state has led to varying outcomes in the renewable energy sector and it will be interesting to observe how the industry changes and grows in these states. To continue to read the full USA, Washington, Hawaii, and Iowa Report as part of our Research Series “The Future is Renewable: Targets and Policies by Country”, please click “Read More”.

Phillip Riley Research Series: USA, California & Texas Report

Phillip riley research series: USA, california & texas report

Historically, California has always been a leader with regards to utilisation of renewable energy technologies. Stemming from concerns of fossil fuel dependence in the 1970s, soon-after began the expansion of California’s solar and wind industry. Currently, under Senate Bill 350 (SB 350) (Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015) California has set an ambitious target of increasing their renewable energy production to 50% of their total power supply by 20301. This target has been extended and adapted from the 2020 target, which was originally set under Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32) (The Global Warming Solution Act of 2006). AB 32 was the first of its kind to be implemented in The United States. The bill stated that it was a requirement for California to significantly reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, in a long-term and sustainable manner. Through a variety of methods, including the successful Cap-and-Trade Program, the Renewable Portfolio Standard and other incentive-based schemes, California has managed to significantly increase their renewable energy supply.

California’s oil industry experienced its peak expansion in the 20th century. The growth in oil occurred as a result of the discovery of new oil fields and the increased demand to power automotive vehicles. However, this rapid expansion soon ended following the impact of the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill. This oil spill, which occurred in Southern California, was the largest of its time to have occurred in the United States3. The large spill had a major impact on marine life and resulted in a large environmental movement involving the implementation of environmental legislation.

Combined primary renewable energy consumption 2004-2014

To continue to read the full USA, California & Texas Report as part of our Research Series “The Future is Renewable: Targets and Policies by Country”, please click “Read More”.

USA, California and Texas Report

California and Texas are both leaders in the renewable energy field, however they differ in their approaches to achieving sustainability. Through legislation, California has clear long-term targets, however Texas currently does not have a state target set. California and Texas use a variety of techniques and incentives in order to reduce emissions. California reduced a significant proportion of their emissions through the Cap-and-Trade program. Texas’ main scheme to reduce emissions is their Renewable Portfolio Standard, which California has now also implemented. Although California and Texas are leaders in the renewable energy field, further developments can be made in order to further reduce their reliance upon natural gas.

To read the full California and Texas report as part of our Research Series, please download the PDF below.